efangelist

putting the FAN in evangelism – spreading your messages by daring to share what you are a FAN of

Make sure you don’t make these business communication blunders when communicating with “foreigners”

efangelist

Do you use confusing Australian expressions? Are you confused by Australian expressions?

Australian business people need to be careful when communicating with “non-Australians” – even other “English speakers” such as Americans.

Australian English is a very colourful and inventive language  – but it is often a mystery to non-Australian speakers and can even be insulting.

I always remember getting into trouble when I lived and studied in the US.

loved uni studying to be a journo and arvos watching the footy

I used the Australian expression “lucky bugger” – and an American colleague took great offence thinking I was calling him a “bugger” (in the strict sense of the word.)

For those who don’t know –  in “Australian”, “bugger” is often used as an intensifier – an expressive way of saying “person” – as in “silly bugger”, “lucky bugger”, “poor bugger” or even “bugger”  as an

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This entry was posted on July 13, 2014 by in Uncategorized.
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